Dennett’s Lexicon

This is a must-have for aspiring philosophers. Daniel Dennett has compiled a satirical Philosophical Lexicon (see here) of key terms that every student of philosophy simply must know. Here are some samples:

chisholm, v. To make repeated small alterations in a definition or example. “He started with definition (d.8) and kept chisholming away at it until he ended up with (d.8””””).”

foucault, n. A howler, an insane mistake. “I’m afraid I’ve committed an egregious foucault.”

getty, adj. Describing a counterexample that obtains its conclusion. “Your first rule raises some interesting questions, but your second is gettier.”

I loved this one:
hume, pron. (1) Indefinite personal and relative pronoun, presupposing no referent. Useful esp. in writing solipsistic treatises, sc. “to hume it may concern.” v. (2) To commit to the flames, bury, or otherwise destroy a philosophical position, as in “That theory was humed in the 1920s.” Hence, exhume, v. to revive a position generally believed to humed.

I couldn’t stop laughing after reading these two:
kripke, adj. Not understood, but considered brilliant. “I hate to admit it, but I found his remarks quite kripke.”

kripkography, n. The opposite of cryptography: the art of translating a meaningless message (about, e.g., de re necessity) into expressions that an uninitiated observer would take to be straightforwardly meaningful (e.g., “Look, it’s not so hard. All he’s saying is that since the term is a rigid designator, it refers to the same thing in all possible worlds”). “He used to claim he just ‘couldn’t understand’ essentialism, but now, thanks to kripkography, he just sits there nodding and smiling.”

planting, v. To use twentieth-century fertilizer to encourage new shoots from eleventh -century ideas which everyone thought had gone to seed; hence, plantinger, n. one who plantings.

quine, v. (1) To deny resolutely the existence of importance of something real or significant. “Some philosophers have quined classes, and some have even quined physical objects.” Occasionally used intr., e.g., “You think I quine, sir. I assure you I do not!” (2) n. The total aggregate sensory surface of the world; hence quinitis, irritation of the quine.

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